Location

By harnessing the power of eco-tourism we are working hard to secure a rich legacy of posterity.

Cheetah Plains Private Reserve comprises an exclusive traverse area set aside for our Cheetah Plains guests.  We do, however, explore the greater area which extends many thousands of hectares beyond our location in the pristine north-west corner of the vast Sabi Sand Game Reserve.  Our particular area is revered for its prime game viewing,  most especially the iconic species known as the ‘Big Five’.

We share our fenceless border to the east with the vast, world famous Kruger National Park and our southern border with the esteemed Mala Mala Game Reserve.  Cheetah Plains’ prime location within the inimitable Sabi Sands delivers a prolific, sustainable safari experience facilitated by the natural movement of wildlife over this vast land, fiercely protected under conservation.

The Sabi Private Game Reserve was formed in 1934, and was the forerunner of the Sabi Sand Wildtuin, which was established in 1948. It is the oldest private game reserve in South Africa and the birthplace of sustainable wildlife tourism in Southern Africa.

A formal association of landowners, many operating commercial safaris, Sabi Sand Game Reserve’s goal is to promote and conserve the fauna and flora in the area and preserve the area as a wildlife sanctuary.

All lodges in the greater Sabi Sand area are involved in environmental management such as alien plant control, combating erosion, monitoring wildlife, anti-poaching and fire control.

Two rivers cross Sabi Sand: the Sabi River on its boundary in the south and the Sand River that flows from northwest to southeast. This has resulted in an abundance of leopard, lion, rhino, elephant, buffalo, cheetah, zebra, giraffe, hyena and a wide variety of antelope and other species. To date 330 tree, 45 fish, 30 amphibian, 110 reptile, 500 bird and 145 mammal species have been noted in Sabi Sand.

A number of endangered species have also made the reserve their home, and visitors to the area are often given a rare glimpse of Honey Badgers, Ground Hornbills and Wild Dogs.

Access

Whether you fly directly to Cheetah Plains on one of the daily scheduled flights from Johannesburg or Nelspruit, or via Madikwe, Cheetah Plains is easily accessible by air.

Gate fees are payable upon arrival. Airstrip passenger taxes apply to passengers on all flights.

Daily flights are available on SA Airlink and Federal Air. (If flying with Federal Air, storage facilities for extra or large luggage is available, should you require this service at their O R Tambo departure lounge).

Weekly flights Sabi Sand – Madikwe every Monday, Wednesday & Friday (Based on a minimum of 4 Guests)

Airports are located within easy driving distance to Cheetah Plains: Arathusa Airstrip is approximately a 20-minute drive within the reserve (usually provided in an open game viewing vehicle), whereas Hoedspruit Airport takes about 1.5 hours and allow 3 hours to Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport.

Road transfers from Hoedspruit Airport or Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport can be booked directly through Cheetah Plains.

Please note that it is advisable to carry a small duffel bag or soft case (20 kg limit) in your main suitcase for your time at the lodge. The airlines do not accept rigid cases but will store them while you are at Cheetah Plains, so you will have to pack your soft bag with your clothing and other equipment for your safari, and then leave the hard  suitcase at the airline offices, where they will take care of it.

Charter flights can be arranged any other day of the week – for more information or to make a booking contact us .

T & C’s apply

The Sabi Sand Game Reserve

Renowned for Big Five game viewing, the Sabi Sand Game Reserve lies adjacent to the south-west corner of The Kruger National Park, with which it shares a 50-kilometer boundary.

There are no fences between the two reserves, allowing game to move freely between the areas and, as a result, the reserve offers some of the most exceptional wildlife in southern Africa.

Two rivers cross Sabi Sand: The Sabi River on its boundary in the south and the Sand River that flows from northwest to southeast. This has resulted in an abundance of leopard, lion, rhino, elephant, buffalo, cheetah, zebra, giraffe, hyena and a wide variety of antelope and other species.

To date 330 tree, 45 fish, 30 amphibian, 110 reptile, 500 bird and 145 mammal species have been noted in Sabi Sand. A number of endangered species have also made the reserve their home, and visitors to the area are often given a rare glimpse of Honey Badgers, Ground Hornbills and Wild Dogs.

Sabi Private Game Reserve was formed in 1934, and was the forerunner of the Sabi Sand Wildtuin, which was established in 1948. It is the oldest private game reserve in South Africa and the birthplace of sustainable wildlife tourism in Southern Africa.

A formal association of landowners, many operating commercial safaris, Sabi Sand Game Reserve’s goal is to promote and conserve the fauna and flora in the area and preserve the area as a wildlife sanctuary.

All lodges in the greater Sabi Sand area are involved in environmental management such as alien plant control, combating erosion, monitoring wildlife, anti-poaching and fire control.